Journal no 10; 26th November 2012

Today we revisited the hugely important subject of ethics and values in counselling, and in particular, how they relate to us in our placements, and in practise.

The BACP encourages its members to aspire to the following personal moral qualities

Empathy: the ability to communicate understanding of another person’s experience from that person’s perspective.

Sincerity: a personal commitment to consistency between what is professed and what is done.

Integrity: commitment to being moral in dealings with others, personal straightforwardness, honesty and coherence.

Resilience: the capacity to work with the client’s concerns without being personally diminished.

Respect: showing appropriate esteem to others and their understanding of themselves.

Humility: the ability to assess accurately and acknowledge one’s own strengths and weaknesses.

Competence: the effective deployment of the skills and knowledge needed to do what is required.

Fairness: the consistent application of appropriate criteria to inform decisions and actions.

Wisdom: possession of sound judgement that informs practice.

Courage: the capacity to act in spite of known fears, risks and uncertainty.

Through much discussion within the group, we all questioned these qualities within ourselves – whether they had been tested in any situations so far, whether we could imagine hypothetical situations in which they would be tested and so on. We all hope to aspire to these qualities, but there are times when we all question whether or not we may fall slightly short. I know that in a recent counselling session, my own counsellor helped me to identify a need to strengthen my own resilience. The last term of extreme introspection has made me feel weaker and more vulnerable than I ever have before, at times. Of course, at others, it has given me extreme strength and wisdom, and I know that self-awareness is the key to becoming a sound counsellor, so I will learn how to strengthen my own reserves at the same time from now on; Developing our own ways of coping, and improving our practise is easier when we have this structure to work towards.

The BACP website states that the fundamental values of counselling and psychotherapy include a commitment to:

  • Respecting human rights and dignity
  • Ensuring the integrity of practitioner-client relationships
  • Enhancing the quality of professional knowledge and its application
  • Alleviating personal distress and suffering
  • Fostering a sense of self that is meaningful to the person(s) concerned
  • Increasing personal effectiveness
  • Enhancing the quality of relationships between people
  • Appreciating the variety of human experience and culture
  • Striving for the fair and adequate provision of counselling and psychotherapy services

In our group discussion, we all agreed that the morals and values that we have talked about are rapidly becoming who we are.  Confidence in our abilities as therapists has led to less fear of any awkward issues arising. For instance, one of the hypothetical situations that many of the group expressed nervousness about dealing with would be in a case involving child abuse.  However, on further exploration of those feelings, that fear was dissolved by the understanding that every person that enters into the therapeutic contract is always considered as a human being first; their behaviours are secondary, and a counsellors must never be judgemental, as there is usually a story behind an abuser, leading to an understanding of why they have fallen into such behaviour patterns.

Morning’s discussion over, the afternoon’s skills practise led me into new waters. I purposely chose to work with a group member I don’t know so well, someone I hadn’t ever worked with before. Why? I don’t know, really. The reason I hadn’t worked with her already is unclear to me – I have always thought her a perfectly lovely person, but I suppose I was slightly intimidated by her quietness, thinking it may lead to awkwardness in the counselling situation (there is a judgment in itself – tsk!) Of course, I was completely wrong. It was a wonderful session – I enjoyed being with her so much, aside from the material we discussed, I just loved the feeling of building a relationship. Core conditions established; the relationship is key, and as I discovered then, can be just as powerful for the counsellor as the client. A new relationship can be just as energising within the context of a counselling relationship as they are in the outside world! The inspiration from that counselling session left my head buzzing with thoughts and ideas, and I’m afraid to say I was not a terribly active participant in the process group that took place straight afterwards. All of my learning was going on internally, and I didn’t feel the need to share it with the rest of the group – or more to the point, I didn’t think that they would be interested in any way in what was going on in my head.

On the subject of ‘what was going on in my head’, the last part of the day was spent looking at an article discussing our ‘internal supervisor’ from Therapy Today. The ‘internal supervisor’ is the source we counsellors have within ourselves, an ability to self-monitor, to step back from the situation, both whilst within the session, and afterwards too; to reflect and learn from what took place.  One quote in particular really stood out for me “an internal locus of evaluation can lead the supervisee to lessening reliance on the evaluations and opinions of others, and to developing more faith and belief in their own judgement”

Certainly valuable words for the student counsellor; unsure and nervous about ‘doing the right or wrong thing’ as I am, but equally valuable words for my everyday life too – I must learn to have more faith in my own intuitions; Definitely an ability I have been less confident in over the last few years. Call it a career move!

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